THE NATURE OF DISAPPEARANCE

PART 2 GROUP SHOW CURATED BY DIETER BUCHHART

Previous Location

June 28 – August 10, 2012

Roman Signer

Osterhase mit Rakete, 2007

Rocket, easter bunny, flake boards, trestles

40.16 x 41.34 x 18.11 inches, 102 x 105 x 46 cm

Lucio Fontana

Concetto spaziale, Attese, 1968

Acrylic on canvas

23.6 x 19.7 in 60 x 50 cm

Carey Young

Missing Mass, 2010

5,461 dark matter particles present in perspex container, on pedestal with silkscreened text

container: 18 x 18 x 18 inches 45.7 x 45.7 x 45.7 cm; pedestal: 38 x 18 x 18 inches 96.5 x 45.7 x 45.7 cm 

Edition 1/3, 1 AP

Ayse Erkmen

Tangerine Tango, 2012

paint on existing skylight

67 x 89 1/2 inches, 170.2 x 227.3 cm

Hermann Nitsch

Untitled (relic montage), 1962, revised in 1963

Plaster, paper tissue, elastic bandage, blood, oil crayon on primed canvas

Framed: 55 1/4 x 64 3/4 inches, 140 x 164.5 cm

Gina Pane

Action relic of "Azione Melanconica", 1974

Textile, blood

Framed: 13 1/2 x 9 3/4 x 1 3/4, inches 34.5 x 25 x 4.5 cm

Peter Scott, Untitled (Police Sketches), 2012 

ink on reverse of wallpaper dimensions variable

On mantle: Suzanne Anker, Ghost Wedding, 2011

Porcelain 3 parts: 6 x 7 x 6 1/2 inches, 15.2 x 17.8 x 16.5 cm; 4 1/2 x 6 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, 11.4 x 16.5 x 14 cm; 4 1/4 x 4 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches, 10.8 x 11.4 x 9.5 cm

Roman Signer

Burostuhl (Office chair), 2006

Video; color, sound

Duration: 1 minutes, 3 seconds

Andy Warhol

Diamond Dust Oxidation Painting, 1978

Urine, metallic pigment and acrylic with diamond dust on canvas

40 x 30 inches, 101.6 x 76.2 cm

Bas Jan Ader

Sawing, 1971/2003

Triptych: Three silver-gelatin print

8 7/8 x 13 3/8 inches, 22.5 x 34 cm

Edition of 3

Marcel Duchamp

L.H.O.O.Q, 1964 (replica of 1919 original)

Colored reproduction, heightened with pencil and white gouache (Arturo Schwartz edition)

11 3/4 x 7 7/8 inches, 29.8 x 20 cm

Edition 32/35

Lois Weinberger

Invasion, 2007

Mushrooms and mirror

23 3/4 x 15 3/4 x 6 inches, 60.3 x 40 x 15.2 cm

Bas Jan Ader

Untitled (Swedish Fall), 1971/2003

Two color photographs

16 x 16 inches, 40.6 x 40.6 cm

Edition of 3

Robert Smithson

Spiral Jetty, 1970

16mm film on video, color, sound

RT: 35 min 54 secs

Yoko Ono

Smoke Painting, 1961/2012

Linen canvas, instruction

35 1/2 x 55 1/4 inches, 90 x 140 cm

Lucio Fontana

18 Concetto Spaziale, 1960

Linen

36 3/8 x 28 3/4 inches, 92.4 x 73 cm

Barnaby Furnas

Little Piggy (Effigy X- XIII), 2006

Dye, bleach, spit, ink, graphite, photocopy on soiled, punctured, crumpled burnt and folded paper

8 1/2 x 10 inches, 21.6 x 25.4 cm

Barnaby Furnas

Little Piggy (Effigy XI- XIII), 2006

Dye, bleach, spit, ink, graphite, photocopy on soiled, punctured, crumpled burnt and folded paper

8 1/2 x 10 1/4 inches, 21.6 x 26 cm

Barnaby Furnas

Heart Fucker (Effigy II- XIII), 2006

Dye, bleach, spit, ink, graphite, photocopy on soiled, punctured, crumpled burnt and folded paper

7 1/4 x 11 1/4 inches, 18.4 x 28.6 cm

Barnaby Furnas

Little Piggy (Effigy IX - XIII), 2006

Dye, bleach, spit, ink, graphite, photocopy on soiled, punctured, crumpled burnt and folded paper

8 1/2 x 11 1/4 inches, 21.6 x 28.6 cm

Suzanne Anker

Ghost Wedding, 2011

Porcelain

3 parts: 6 x 7 x 6 1/2 inches, 15.2 x 17.8 x 16.5 cm; 4 1/2 x 6 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, 11.4 x 16.5 x 14 cm; 4 1/4 x 4 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches, 10.8 x 11.4 x 9.5 cm

The Nature of Disappearance: Part II (Installation view)

Marianne Boesky Gallery, Uptown, 2012

The Nature of Disappearance: Part II (Installation view)

Marianne Boesky Gallery, Uptown, 2012

The Nature of Disappearance: Part II (Installation view)

Marianne Boesky Gallery, Uptown, 2012

The Nature of Disappearance: Part II (Installation view)

Marianne Boesky Gallery, Uptown, 2012

The Nature of Disappearance: Part II (Installation view)

Marianne Boesky Gallery, Uptown, 2012

The Nature of Disappearance: Part II (Installation view)

Marianne Boesky Gallery, Uptown, 2012

The Nature of Disappearance: Part II (Installation view)

Marianne Boesky Gallery, Uptown, 2012

The Nature of Disappearance: Part II (Installation view)

Marianne Boesky Gallery, Uptown, 2012

The Nature of Disappearance: Part II (Installation view)

Marianne Boesky Gallery, Uptown, 2012

The Nature of Disappearance: Part II (Installation view)

Marianne Boesky Gallery, Uptown, 2012

“The art of the future (which will disappear, like everything else): Imitate nature in an approximate way; imitate in particular nature’s way of creating!”
– August Strindberg, 1894
On the 100th anniversary of the death of the famous Swedish artist August Strindberg, “The Nature of Disappearance” takes as the exhibition’s point of departure Strindberg’s radical view of art, which he first expressed in his article Du hasard dans la production artistique (“New Forms of Art! Or Chance in Artistic Creation”), November 1894. Strindberg’s paradigmatic rejection of the complete control that the artist could exercise through skill and virtuosity triggered a new chapter in art history.
Strindberg’s radical creative experiments and his introduction of the apparently unintentional influenced the famous Norwegian printmaker and painter Edvard Munch. Like the Swedish artist, Munch integrated the elements of chance and accident into his artistic practice through his legendary “kill or cure” treatment. In his work, he did not just mimic the way nature created but rather, he actually let nature create. “Just wait until it has been exposed to a couple of showers, been gashed a little by some sharp nails and so forth, and then been carted around the world in all sorts of miserable, leaking boxes.… Oh yes, in due course I think this could be good! … It only needs a few flaws in order to become really good ….” In Munch’s oeuvre, mildew stains, pronounced water and rust marks, bird droppings, as well as holes and cracks, serve as physical traces of time, as part of the various things that have happened to the painting. The intentionally initiated process of decay becomes part of the work’s aesthetic, and the work becomes the visual expression of transience itself. The natural process partly progresses toward the painting’s total destruction, through which Munch identifies the ephemeral and the fleeting as a deliberate part of his artistic creative process. Even contemporaries of Munch, such as James Abbott McNeill Whistler, the American Impressionist John Henry Twachtman, and the Russian avant-gardist Vladimir Burliuk, also exposed their works to the elements and allowed nature to work with them, albeit less dramatically and consequentially than Munch.
Thereby the exhibition explores the nature of disappearance, that is, the concept of the literal, physical loss of the artwork and in doing so further analyzes how artists who have come after Strindberg and Munch not only question the intactness of the object and the artwork but also literally allow nature to create the work and challenge material integrity, ultimately annihilating the art object. With Dada, and in particular with Marcel Duchamp, artists transgressed the classical borders of the work of art in that they no longer placed the production of the work in the foreground but rather constituted life itself as art. With the disappearance of the art object, art became not only an end, but also a means – a process for the artist. The artwork became assailable, vulnerable, and destructible. In the works of Yoko Ono, Joseph Beuys, Robert Smithson and Bas Jan Ader, the object is no longer a necessary condition for artistic creation. Similar to Munch, artists such as Gustav Metzger, Dieter Roth and Mathias Kessler allow the “kill or cure treatment” of natural forces to create, relying on the natural processes of decay, disintegration, and transformation, while Félix González-Torres leaves the physical dissolution of his work to the public.
Thus, “The Nature of Disappearance” presents different artistic views of this theme and refers, on the one hand, to its fundamental importance in contemporary art of the 21st century and, on the other hand, to the roots of this radical artistic concept.
The exhibition will run from June 28 through August 10, 2012 at the gallery’s two locations - 118 East 64th Street and 509 West 24th Street. The curator of the exhibition is the international Munch expert and art historian Dr. Dieter Buchhart. Our summer hours are Monday to Friday from 10 am to 6 pm. For further information or images, please contact Serra Pradhan at 212.680.9889 or serra@marianneboeskygallery.com.
LIST OF ARTISTS
Bas Jan Ader
Suzanne Anker
Antonin Artaud
Joseph Beuys
Vladimir Burliuk
Pier Paolo Calzolari
César
Song Dong
Marcel Duchamp
Christian Eisenberger
Ayse Erkmen
Marco Evaristti
Lucio Fontana
Barnaby Furnas
Félix González-Torres
Mathias Kessler
Anselm Kiefer
Toni Kleinlercher
Gustav Metzger
Edvard Munch
Hermann Nitsch
Yoko Ono
Gina Pane
Dieter Roth
Peter Scott
Dana Sherwood
Roman Signer
Robert Smithson
August Strindberg
Paul Thek
John Henry Twachtman
Andy Warhol
Lois Weinberger
James McNeill Whistler
Carey Young